Its hot out there!

July 15, 2015

 

I started my day yesterday by taking a shower, having a nice light breakfast and an energy drink. Feeling pretty darn good, start tending to my morning to do's and about 30 min into it, im sweating so much my houseplants might actually get some water today! lol, Funny right?? yeah?...nnno ok, moving on..

 

Its hot in South Texas if you havent figured that out already. It doesnt take much to wonder why you even took a shower in the first place! So heres a few tips I've gathered for you to help you keep your home cool this summer without the $300 energy bill!! 

 

 

1. Keep your blinds closed. 
As simple as this tip may seem, A lot of unwanted heat comes from your windows, and utilizing shades, curtains and the like can save you up to 7 percent on your bills and lower indoor temperatures by up to 20 degrees. In other words, closing the blinds essentially prevents your home from becoming a miniature greenhouse, which is especially the case for south- and west-facing windows.

 

2. Be smart about your doors. 
Closing off rooms will prevent the cool air from permeating these areas during the hottest part of the day. You'll want to capitalize on the cooler night hours, too, letting air flow naturally through your home.

 

 

3. Set your ceiling fans to rotate counter-clockwise. 
Whether you know it or not, your ceiling fan needs to be adjusted seasonally. Setcounter-clockwise in the summer at a higher speed, the fan's airflow will create a wind-chill breeze effect that will make you and your guests "feel" cooler.

 

 

 

4. Focus on the temperature in your body, not the house. 

If your ancestors survived without air conditioning, so can you. From sipping tasty iced drinks to applying a cold cloth to strong-pulsed areas like your neck and wrists, cooling yourself from the inside out is not a bad idea.

 

6. Let the night air in. 

During the summer months, temperatures may drop during the night. If this is the case where you live, make the most of these refreshing hours by cracking the windows before you go to bed. Just be sure to close the windows (and the blinds) before things get too hot in the morning.

 

 

7.Ditch the incandescent lights.

If you ever needed motivation to make the switch to CFLs, or compact fluorescent lamps, this is it. Incandescent bulbs waste about 90 percent of their energy in the heatthey emit, so tossing them to the curb will make a small difference in cooling your home while lowering your electric bill.

 

8. Programable Thermostats

Through proper use of a programmable thermostat (using the four pre-programmed settings) you can save about $180* every year in energy costs. Here are a few tips from energystar.org

  • Keep the temperature set at its energy savings set-points for long periods of time (at least eight hours), for example, during the day, when no one is at home, and through the night, after bedtime.

  • All thermostats let you temporarily make an area warmer or cooler, without erasing the pre-set programming. This override is cancelled automatically at the next program period. You use more energy (and end up paying more on energy bills) if you consistently “hold” or over-ride the pre-programmed settings.

  • Units typically have two types of hold features: (a) hold/permanent/vacation; (b) temporary. Avoid using the hold/permanent/vacation feature to manage day to day temperature settings. “Hold” or “vacation” features are best when you're planning to be away for an extended period. Set this feature at a constant, efficient temperature (i.e. several degrees warmer temperature in summer, several degrees cooler during winter), when going away for the weekend or on vacation. You'll waste energy and money if you leave the “hold” feature at the comfort setting while you're away.

  • Cranking your unit up to 90 degrees or down to 40 degrees, for example, will not heat or cool your house any faster. Most thermostats begin to heat or cool at a set time, to reach setpoint temperatures sometime thereafter. Units with adaptive (smart/intelligent) recovery features are an exception to this rule � Adaptive recovery units are constantly calculating the amount of time required to heat or cool the house, so that it reaches that temperature when the homeowner programmed it. By "examining" the performance of the past few days the thermostat can keep track of the seasons. In this way, your house is always at the comfort levels when occupied, but saving the most energy when unoccupied.

  • Many homes use just one thermostat to control the whole house. If your home has multiple heating or cooling zones, you'll need a programmed setback thermostat for each zone to maximize comfort, convenience and energy savings throughout the house.

  • If your programmable thermostat runs on batteries, don't forget to change the batteries each year. Some units will indicate when batteries must be changed.

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